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ISBN 13: 9780521113809

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Bioethical issues in publications about palliative care of the elderly: critical analysis

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Moreover, he thinks persisting human consciousness and values would degrade over time, being remade by tortoise needs and environment. The value available in the transformation would not, then, make the additional years of life desirable.

Some people might still want this kind of transformation for symbolic reasons, but it would probably be better that no human consciousness persist, since that consciousness would be inexpressible as such. Even so, it is not irrational to prefer various kinds of lifespan extension even if they involve significant modifications to human consciousness and values.

Ryan Tonkens Although the philosophical literature on the ethics of human prenatal genetic alteration PGA purports to inform us about how to act, it rarely explicitly recognizes the perspective of those who will be making the PGA decision in practice. From this perspective, I generate a sound verdict on the moral standing of human PGA research : given the current state of the art, good parents have compelling reason not to consent to PGA research for their child, especially as part of the first wave s of PGA research participants and especially for non-medically oriented purposes.

This is because doing otherwise is inconsistent with a plausible and defensible understanding of virtuous parenting and parental virtues, founded on a genuine concern for promoting the overall flourishing of the eventual child. In essence, given the current and foreseeable state of the art, parents who allow prenatal genetic alteration of their children are less-than-virtuous parents to those children, even in cases where they have a right to do so and even if PGA turns out to be beneficial to the eventual child.

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However, recent writing about the legacy of the inquiry has challenged the legitimacy of the inquiry and contributed to a climate questioning the value of the ethical reforms initiated by it. This article describes unsuccessful attempts to correct factual errors in one publication criticizing the inquiry. These attempts at correction raise ethical issues about the dissemination of the products of medical research—in particular, about the place of research subjects in post-publication ethical deliberations and the responsibility of universities and publishers in decision-making, especially in relation to the correction of error in academic publications.

Holloway Resistance by physicians, medical researchers, medical educators, and medical students to pharmaceutical industry influence in medicine is often based on the notion that physicians guided by the ethics of their profession and the industry guided by profit are in conflict. This criticism has taken the form of a professional movement opposing conflict of interest COI in medicine and medical education and has resulted in policies and guidelines that frame COI as the problem and outline measures to address this problem.

In this paper, I offer a critique of this focus on COI that is grounded in a broader critique of neo-liberalism, arguing it individualizes the relationship between physicians and industry, too neatly delineates between the two entities, and reduces the network of social, economic, and political relations to this one dilemma. These values influence the way in which end-of-life decision-making is confronted. The objective of this study was to explore the perspective of Roma women on end-of-life decision-making. It was a qualitative study involving thirty-three Roma women belonging to groups for training and social development in two municipalities.

We brought together five focus groups between February and December Six mediators each recruited five to six participants. We considered age and care role to be the variables that can have the most influence on opinion regarding end-of-life decision-making. We considered the discussion saturated when the ideas expressed were repeated.

Medical ethics

The main ideas gleaned from the data were as follows: 1 the important role of the family in end-of-life care, especially the role of women; 2 the large influence of community opinion over personal or family decisions, typical of closed societies; 3 the different preferences women had for themselves compared to that for others regarding desired end-of-life care; 4 unawareness or rejection of advance directives.

Nuannuan Lin This article is the first exploration of the Chinese notion of apology from a comparative legal perspective. By reviewing the significance of apology in the context of Chinese culture, the article presents a three-dimensional structure of apology that, in contrast to the understanding the research community now has, defines acknowledgement of fault, admission of responsibility, and offer of reparation as three essential elements of an apology.

End-of-life care: how are decisions made?

It is the combination of these three elements that enables apology to serve as a form of reparation. Michael D. Dahnke Most modern ethicists and ethics textbooks assert that religion holds little or no place in ethics, including fields of professional ethics like medical ethics. This assertion, of course, implicitly refers to ethical reasoning, but there is much more to the ethical life and the practice of ethics—especially professional ethics—than reasoning.

It is no surprise that teachers of practical ethics, myself included, often focus on reasoning to the exclusion of other aspects of the ethical life. Especially for those with a philosophical background, reasoning is the most patent and pedagogically controllable aspect of the ethical life—and the most easily testable. And whereas there may be powerful reasons for the limitation of religion in this aspect of ethics, there are other aspects of the ethical life in which recognition of religious belief may arguably be more relevant and possibly even necessary. I divide the ethical life into three areas—personal morality, interpersonal morality, and rational morality—each of which I explore in terms of its relationship to religion, normatively characterized by the qualities of devotion, diversity, and reasoning, respectively.

The Journal of Bioethical Inquiry provides a multidisciplinary scholarly forum for reflective debate and analysis of bioethical issues and the differences of opinion and approach that they generate. It aims to connect diverse academic, professional, scientific, artistic, and community voices in a global conversation that involves our contributors, readers, and the editorial team to promote greater understanding across disciplinary, ideological, and geographical borders.

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Official Journal of -- and -- Official Partner Journal of. What Should We Eat? The Race Idea in Reproductive Technologies: Beyond Epistemic Scientism and Technological Mastery Camisha Russell This paper explores the limitations of epistemic scientism for understanding the role the concept of race plays in assisted reproductive technology ART practices.

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Culture, Truth, and Science After Lacan Grant Gillett Truth and knowledge are conceptually related and there is a way of construing both that implies that they cannot be solely derived from a description that restricts itself to a set of scientific facts. Parental Virtue and Prenatal Genetic Alteration Research Ryan Tonkens Although the philosophical literature on the ethics of human prenatal genetic alteration PGA purports to inform us about how to act, it rarely explicitly recognizes the perspective of those who will be making the PGA decision in practice.

Reviews Love and Mercy K. Written by The JBI The Journal of Bioethical Inquiry provides a multidisciplinary scholarly forum for reflective debate and analysis of bioethical issues and the differences of opinion and approach that they generate. Search Search the JBI. A place for those engaged in bioethics, no matter what geographical region or academic discipline you call home.